Archive for the ‘ASP.Net’ Category

Subversion and Mercurial

Having  used both Subversion and Mercurial, I think the best starting points so you can get your own conclusions about them are these posts:

Subversion: [Setting up and running Subversion and Tortoise SVN with Visual Studio and .NET][1]

Mercurial: [Hg Init: a Mercurial tutorial][2]

In short, Mercurial is a distributed version control system, while Subversion is a centralized one.

On Subversion, you “commit” and “update” directly to/from the central and unique repository.

On Mercurial, you “commit” and “update” to your local personal repository. Once you’re sure your code is ready, you can “push” your changes to the central repository. To get other people changes, you have to “pull” from the central repository.

  [1]: http://www.west-wind.com/presentations/subversion/
  [2]: http://hginit.com/index.html

Anuncios

Subversion: poner un proyecto bajo control de código fuente

Tengo un proyecto de una aplicación web ASP.Net en una carpeta (E:\MyWebApp) en mi PC.
Quiero ponerlo bajo control de código fuente usando Subversion.

  1. Crear una carpeta vacía (E:\MyEmptyWebApp) en mi PC.
  2. Importarla al repositorio: click derecho, TortoiseSVN->Import.
  3. En URL of Repository, escribir: svn://192.168.10.20/MyWebApp. Presionar OK.
  4. Ir a la carpeta que contiene la aplicación (E:\MyWebApp).
  5. Click derecho, SVN Checkout.
  6. En URL of Repository, escribir: svn://192.168.10.20/MyWebApp.
  7. En checkout directory, escribir: E:\MyWebApp. Presionar OK.
  8. Esto solo copiará la carpeta oculta “.svn” a la carpeta E:\MyWebApp.
  9. De esta forma, el proyecto estará bajo control de código fuente.
  10. Ahora, agregar los archivos de la carpeta E:\MyWebApp al repositorio, usando:
  11. click derecho, TortoiseSVN->Add.
  12. Click derecho en la carpeta E:\MyWebApp, SVN Commit.
  13. Listo.

How to Schedule a PowerShell Script

VM.Blog.

 

How to Schedule a PowerShell Script

..assuming that you are running PowerShell 2.0..

1. Get your script ready

Surprising as it might sound, your script might actually not be ready to run in a scheduled task as is. This happens if it uses cmdlets from a particular PowerShell module or snapin, and it worked for you interactively because you used a specialized shell (e.g. Exchange Management Shell) or a tool like PowerGUI Script Editor which loads the modules for you.

If you indeed are using using any non-default cmdlets, simply add Add-PSSnapin or Import-Module to the beginning of the script. For example:

Add-PSSnapinQuest.ActiveRoles.ADManagement

2. Schedule the task

To schedule a task simply start Windows Task Scheduler and schedule powershell.exe executable passing the script execution command as a parameter. The -Fileparameter is the default one so simply specifying the script path as the argument would work in a…

Ver la entrada original 691 palabras más

Perspective: “Why C++ Is Not ‘Back’”

Sutter’s Mill

John Sonmez wrote a nice article on the weekend – both the article and the comments are worth reading.

“Why C++ Is Not ‘Back’”

by John Sonmez

I love C++. […] There are plenty of excellent developers I know today that still use C++ and teach others how to use it and there is nothing at all wrong with that.

So what is the problem then?

[…] Everyone keeps asking me if they need to learn C++, but just like my answer was a few years ago, it is the same today—NO!

Ok, so “NO” in caps is a bit harsh.  A better answer is “why?”

[…]

Although I don’t agree with everything John says, he presents something quite valuable, and unfortunately rare: a thoughtful hype-free opinion. This is valuable especially when (not just “even when”) it differs from your own opinion, because combining different thoughtful views of the…

Ver la entrada original 489 palabras más

How to Schedule a PowerShell Script

Dmitry's Blog: Cloud, PowerShell and beyond

Despite multiplearticles on that in the blogospherealready I keep getting questions on running PowerShell as Windows scheduled tasks – so here’s a quick summary what I see as the way to do this (assuming that you are running PowerShell 2.0). I hope you learn something new.

1. Get your script ready

Surprising as it might sound, your script might actually not be ready to run in a scheduled task as is. This happens if it uses cmdlets from a particular PowerShell module or snapin, and it worked for you interactively because you used a specialized shell (e.g. Exchange Management Shell) or a tool like PowerGUI Script Editor which loads the modules for you.

If you indeed are using using any non-default cmdlets, simply add Add-PSSnapin or Import-Module to the beginning of the script. For example:

Add-PSSnapinQuest.ActiveRoles.ADManagement

2. Schedule the task

To schedule a task simply start Windows…

Ver la entrada original 724 palabras más

Los números de 2012

Los duendes de las estadísticas de WordPress.com prepararon un informe sobre el año 2012 de este blog.

Aquí hay un extracto:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 14.000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 3 Film Festivals

Haz click para ver el reporte completo.

Making the Complex Simple

All code can be classified into two distinct roles; code that does work (algorithms) and code that coordinates work (coordinators).

The real complexity that gets introduced into a code bases is usually directly related to the creation of classes that group together both of these roles under one roof.

I’m guilty of it myself.  I would say that 90% of the code I have written does not nicely divide my classes into algorithms and coordinators.

Defining things a bit more clearly

Before I dive into why we should be dividing our code into clear algorithmic or coordinating classes, I want to take a moment to better define what I mean by algorithms and coordinators.

Most of us are familiar with common algorithms in Computer Science like a Bubble Sort or a Binary Search, but what we don’t often realize is that all of our code that does something useful…

Ver la entrada original 957 palabras más